ODS TURKEY

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ODS TURKEY is a leading Destination Management Company based in Istanbul, serving all destinations in Turkey. It is privately owned, limited company founded in 1999 by Sadik Caglar and Hasan Dinç. At the root of ODS Turkey’s successful and exciting 18-year journey lie 30 years of industry experience, a great team of people and wonderful local and international partners they are proud to call friends.

ODS is an entity continuously striving for excellence, leading them to act and reflect, to execute and improve, to inspire and be inspired in order to serve clients best. How they get things done is as important to them as getting things done. Following their long-term orientation, they avoid the quick win and prefer to attain their goals in a solid pace, always keeping in mind the soundness of their company and quality of their services.

ODS TURKEY

ODS Turkey
UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Turkey...

December 2010


UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Turkey

Istanbul

Strategically located on the peninsula between the Balkans and Anatolia and between the Black Sea and the Mediterranean, Istanbul has been associated with major political, religious and artistic movements for more than 2,000 years. The cultural heritage of Istanbul is shaped by its strategic location at the crossroads of Europe, Anatolia, central Asia and the Middle East. 
The city of Istanbul, the only city in the world to straddle two continents, was the capital of three great empires: The East Roman, The Byzantine and the Ottoman, embossing the city with a stunning architectural and cultural legacy manifested as a melting-pot of palaces, churches, mosques, synagogues and countless other historic public and private buildings.
“The Historic Areas of Istanbul” were added to UNESCO’s World Heritage List in 1985, and are composed of four main areas: The Archaeological Park, Süleymaniye Mosque and its associated Conservation Area, Zeyrek Mosque and its associated Conservation Area, Historic Walls of Istanbul.

 

Safranbolu

Situated on the northwest Black Sea coast, Safranbolu is renowned for its charmingly well-preserved Ottoman houses dotted around its cobbled streets, as well as other famed must-sees including the Cinci Hani, a caravanaserai dating back to 1645, the Cinci Hamami, a 17th-century Turkish bath, and ramshackle wooden shops and a street of ironmongers. It is like walking around an open-air museum, as much of this type of architecture has now disappeared from Turkey.
Safranbolu was an important stop on the East-West trade route from the 13th century up to the advent of the railway, reaching its zenith in the 17th Century Ottoman period – and its inhabitants’ wealth is evident in the lavish villas, many of which survive today.

 

Hattusha

The archaeological site of Hattusha, former capital of the Hittite Empire, is one of the most important in Anatolia. At the height of their power, around 1300 BC, the Hittites had conquered most of Anatolia and were rivalling other great powers of the day; Egypt, Babylon and Assyria. Set in a national park area in what is now known as Bogazkoy, the city was originally built around 1600 BC and was a hugely important city, originally containing some 70 temples, the largest of which, Buyuk Mabet, has been extremely well preserved. Perhaps the most famous of its monuments is the Lion’s Gate, or Aslankapi, although originals are now in the Museum of Anatolian Civilisations in Ankara.

 

Nevsehir

Cappadocia’s Göreme valley and its surroundings are one of the most mysterious and extraordinary natural landscapes in the world, even featured as a backdrop in a Star Wars film. Over time, wind and weather have sculpted the sensual curves of this once-volcanic region, forming the pinnacles and peaks now known as 'fairy chimneys'.
This spectacular landscape has been the home of humans since the 4th century and the area is literally infused with cave dwellings, troglodyte villages and underground towns, as well as unique evidence of Byzantine art from the post-Iconoclastic period, much of which has been carefully restored.

 

Sivas

The region of eastern Anatolia was conquered by the Seljuk Turks at the beginning of the 11th Century and became the seat of the Mengucekogullari tribe. In 1228-29, their leader, Emir Ahmet Shah, founded a mosque with its adjoining hospital at Divrigi. The kulliye, or mosque, is one of the finest examples of Seljuk stone carving and architecture in Turkey with its intricate and exuberant sculpture work adorned with carvings of plants and animals. The doorways are particularly ornate.

 

Mount Nemrut

The huge disembodied stone heads of Mount Nemrut are one of Turkey’s most iconic images. The site is remote, on a mountain-top some 2150m high, so it’s not entirely unsurprising that it was discovered as late as 1881 by a Germany engineer carrying out a survey. The statues represent the dream of Antiochus I (69-34 BC), who reigned over the Commagene kingdom. The tomb and temple complex consist of three terraces featuring seated statues of Greek and Persian gods 26-33 feet tall and although decapitated, the remains are still very impressive. The site can now be reached by road.

 

Antalya

The remains of the ancient federation of Lycia, which encompassed some 19 independent cities, can be seen throughout the southwest corner of Turkey. Most striking are their tombs, particularly the rock tombs cut into high cliff faces. Xanthos, situated between Fethiye and Kalkan, became the capital of Lycia during the 2nd century BC and is an impressive site with some excellent examples of Lycian tombs. It was here that a pillar inscribed in both Greek and Lycian was found, which enabled the Lycian language to be understood. Nearby Letoon was the Lycian religious centre, where the many temples can be found; however, today the site is partly flooded.

 

Denizli

Pamukkale literally means ‘cotton castle’ and is one of Turkey’s most impressive natural wonders. Made up of a series of white travertine terraces cascading down a cliff almost 200m high, they are caused by the calcite-laden spring waters which run down the cliff, congregating in warm pools on the terrace. In order to preserve the beauty of the terraces, visitors may not walk through them – but those who want to enjoy the thermal waters can take a dip in the nearby pool amongst fragments of marble pillars.
It was the thermal waters which lead to the founding of the spa town of Hierapolis at the end of the 2nd century BC by the dynasty of the Attalids, the kings of Pergamon. The remains, which can be visited today, include the ancient ruins of the baths, temples, the well-preserved theatre and the largest necropolis or graveyard in Anatolia containing 1,200 tombs.

 

Canakkale

The name of Troy is one of the best known and evocative names of any historic sites in the world. Situated in Turkey close to the town of Canakkale at the entrance to the Dardanelles, it was the site of the siege of Troy by Spartan and Achaean warriors from Greece in the 13th or 12th century BC, immortalised by Homer in the Iliad. In recognition of this, a replica wooden horse stands at the site.
 
Troy is, however, also of archaeological significance. Unearthed in the 19th century by a Germany archaeologist, the site is formed of nine cities dating back to 3000 BC. The fortifications from the 6th city can still be seen, fortifications which were defended by Priam and his sons Hector and Paris – and into which the Greeks smuggled their famous wooden horse.

 

Hotel News

Pera Palace Hotel

Pera Palace Hotel is delighted to announce the reopening of its legendary property on September 1, 2010. The reopening came after an extensive two year, 23 million Euro restoration project. The hotel features 115 rooms, including 16 suites named after the hotel’s most illustrious guests, retains the original grandeur of the property whilst offering state-of-the-art facilities true to a 21st century destination hotel experience.

Located in the cosmopolitan Tepebaşi district of Pera, Pera Palace Hotel overlooks the Golden Horn. Establishment work of the hotel began in 1892 and its grand opening ball was held in 1895. Pera Palace Hotel was the first luxury hotel in the Ottoman Empire and provided the last destination stop in the East for passengers onboard The Orient Express.

It has also played host to a wide range of luminaries, celebrities, politicians and heads of state. The signature rooms have been named after the illustrious guests who walked through the doors. These include leader and founder of modern Turkey, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk; crime writer Agatha Christie, who according to popular belief found her inspiration for “Murder on the Orient Express” within the walls of the Pera Palace, the Emperor of Austria-Hungary, Franz Joseph, King Edward VIII, Greta Garbo, Pierre Loti, Ernest Hemingway and many more.

 

Edition Hotel

The first of the Edition series of hotels will soon be opened in Istanbul. The Edition Hotel Istanbul will offer seven-star comfort to its guests and will cost 100 million euros.

"We will open a seven-star hotel to offer the best service possible to Istanbul, the European Culture Capital of 2010. The Edition Hotel will have 80 rooms, all suites. There will be the finest restaurant brands of the world and a SPA service."

The design of the Edition Hotels belongs to Ian Schrager, one of the creators of Studio 54, New York’s legendary nightclub. Schrager introduced the concept of boutique hotels to the sector 23 years ago. His designs for hotels such as Hudson and Gremercy Park have attracted much attention. Schrager and Marriott International have designed the Edition series together. The Edition series aims to combine high quality with modern design, originality and authentic factors.

 

For more information, please contact Mr. Sadik Caglar or Mr. Hasan Dinç at turkey@euromic.com

Istanbul

Safranbolu

Corum & Goreme & Nevsehir

Sivas

Antalya

Denizli

Canakkale

Pera Palace Hotel

Pera Palace Hotel

The Istanbul Edition